In July 2015, I organized a roundtable discussion at the annual World History Association meeting in Savannah, Georgia, that I called “Lived Histories.” The idea was to gather historians, anthropologists, sociologists, and other academics who had themselves been eyewitnesses to revolutions, rebellions, and coups.  My aim was to explore how primary sources are created and to ask questions about the possibilities and limits of doing historical research based on eyewitness accounts.  In particularly, I wanted to focus on the complexities and tensions that exist between one’s own lived history and the reliability of their memories, to reflexively explore and analyze the way historians and other scholars alike understand and approach the process of thinking historically.  Fundamentally, what does it mean to remember, not only our own past, but the past in general, and how can scholars reflect upon these numerous intricacies to simultaneously highlight the limitations and merits of historical research?

I am now in the process of soliciting contributions for an edited volume on this subject and invite all who, like myself, have experienced and lived through demonstrations, street fights, assassinations, arrests, terror, and governmental collapse to share their adventures and experiences as a way to better understand and examine what these events meant and how we remember them.

Proposals should include:

1) Name and affiliation

2) Brief bio

3) Title and short abstract (150-200 words)

4) Brief CV

Contact Info: 

Dr. David Blanks

Professor of History

Arkansas Tech University

Contact Email: 
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