Seeking panelists for the panel “Teaching Literature, Teaching History” at ACCUTE 2016.

ACCUTE (Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English) will be held in Calgary, Alberta, May 28-31, 2016. International scholars welcome.

Deadline for Proposals is November 1, 2015. Full details about the panel, conference, and proposal procedures can be found at http://accute.ca/accute-conference/accute-cfp-member-organized-panels/

The CFP is pasted below. Send queries to Moberley Luger at mluger@mail.ubc.ca

Teaching Literature, Teaching History
Organizers: Moberley Luger (UBC)

In an essay about teaching literature of the Holocaust, the British scholar Nicola King writes that she “cannot help confessing a need to [first] somehow provide students with a bedrock of solid historical fact.” This “confession” suggests the sometimes awkward place of history in the literature classroom. As instructors, we often supply our students with historical context for a given text (yet from what sources, with what authority, and in what language?) even as we position literature as, in many cases, complicating or challenging “official history.” So, this panel asks, how do we approach history when we teach literature? Papers may offer pragmatic approaches (addressing individual texts from a range of historical periods) and/or theoretical ones (considering how theories of memory, for example, inform our teaching). Possible topics may include, but are not limited to the following:

-methods for discussing history, particularly difficult history, in the literature classroom
-teaching histories described as “unspeakable” or “unknowable”
-challenges of teaching specific texts and/or genres
-teaching “hoax” texts
-relations of memory, history, and forgetting in the classroom
-relations of personal and public memory/history in the classroom
-teaching historical testimony, memoir, or autobiography
-the possibilities and limits of New Historicism in the classroom

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